Comparing political candidates has always been difficult, at least for me. I read with great interest the blog by Moonseed posted yesterday Nov 23 about the web site selectsmart.com. She made a wonderful find here. There are twenty-six questions you answer on the site provided by selectsmart.com. The priority of your answer to each question can be adjusted to either low or high. At the end, based on your input, all the candidates are weighted with a percentage that conforms to an ideal candidate based on how you answered the questions. My top six are below:

1. Theoretical Ideal Candidate  (100 %) 
 2.  Barack Obama  (88 %) 

 3.  Dennis Kucinich  (81 %) 
 4.  Joseph Biden  (81 %) 
 5.  Christopher Dodd  (80 %) 
 6.  Hillary Clinton  (80 %) 
While I really like this insight provided, the utility activated by clicking on the information link next to the candidates name that outputs in the above list allows you to compare any two candidates and their positions This feature is, dare I use this overworked word, awesome. Like a lot of voters, I use my “sense” of the candidate rather than deeply researching their positions. Obviously, this can be a big mistake. This comparison feature, takes the work out of research and gives a very information summary.

This election is somewhat unique in that there are no incumbents running for president. This has enabled debates that previous incumbents were reticent to participate in. After all, they had everything to lose. Most of the candidates on both sides are participating in most of the debates, most of the time. I consider myself a centrist and came to the conclusion that I will vote for whoever seems able to win on the democratic side. I just feel we need a change, all around. I’m leaning for Hillary because she seems she can pull it off, but if Obama seems to be overtaking her, I may go with him.

Of course, we have to ask – can this site be trusted? As far as I can tell, it seems accurate and trustworthy. Still, in politics, you always have to keep one eye open and remember the Reagan maxim, “Trust but verify”.

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