Google has a introduced a new web browser named Chrome, which is currently a beta product, on Tuesday, September 2. It is an open source browser. Google developed the browser in response to many applications being ported to the web. These app’s need a browser to run in and Google wants to supply that browser.

Operating systems such as Windows are not as important as they once were, with many systems operating all the key functions and features users desire.

Google believes the browser should be less intrusive on the user experience, use less processor power and system resources to run the app’s consumers need while at the same time offering up a bullet proof architecture that should reduce browser crashes. If anyone uses IE 7, you are well aware of browser crashes. Many people using Internet Explorer have stayed with IE 6.

The architecture segregates each open browser into a separate partition in memory, which also has the side benefit of enhancing security through separating the activity of a malicious web site and restricting it from reaching outside the partition to harm any other processes taking place on the computer.

Google relied on open source development already pioneered by Mozilla. Also, the engine behind Apple’s Safari browser was relied on in developing Chrome.

Reportedly, it is very fast, exceeding Firefox in many instances. Simple in design, able to create application shortcuts on your desktop, and a tab system that is located at the top of the browser. A task manager lets you monitor which web pages or add-ons are consuming the most processor resources. The tabs can be dragged around to a separate area of the desktop. The search and address line have been combined into one.

Chrome doesn’t support the extensions in Firefox and there is no print preview feature. Still, it is an interesting development in the browser wars and may prod Microsoft into improving their browser with the release of IE 8, rather than just issuing a stock release that doesn’t have much feature enrichment.

I still like Firefox but will use Chrome occasionally to put it through its paces. I’m a geek, and will be looking to monitor its development down the road.

The upload link for Chrome is: http://www.google.com/chrome/eula.html?hl=en&brand=CHMG&utm_source=en-hpp&utm_medium=hpp&utm_campaign=en

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